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Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

4 edition of Placental transfusion found in the catalog.

Placental transfusion

Alice C. Yao

Placental transfusion

a clinical and physiological study

by Alice C. Yao

  • 386 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by Thomas in Springfield, Ill .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Infants (Newborn) -- Physiology.,
  • Blood volume.,
  • Maternal-fetal exchange.,
  • Fetal blood.,
  • Umbilical cord -- Ligature.,
  • Maternal -- Fetal exchange.,
  • Infant, Newborn.,
  • Umbilical cord.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Alice C. Yao, John Lind.
    ContributionsLind, John, 1909- joint author.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRJ252 .Y36 1982
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 175 p. :
    Number of Pages175
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4112808M
    ISBN 100398044376
    LC Control Number80027892

    The effect of gravity on placental transfusion was studied by measuring the placental residual blood volume (P.R.B.V.) in one hundred and twelve normal deliveries with the infants kept at different levels above or below the mother's introitus after birth. Objective While delayed umbilical cord clamping (UCC) is thought to facilitate placental to infant blood transfusion, the physiological factors regulating flow in the umbilical arteries and veins during delayed UCC is unknown. We investigated the effects of gravity, by changing fetal height relative to the placenta, and ventilation on umbilical blood flows and the cardiovascular transition.

    [2][3][4] Placental transfusion has been shown to reduce the incidence of lateonset sepsis in preterm neonates, supporting the idea that umbilical cord blood has constituents that may help in ways. Placental transfusion implementation requires a multidisciplinary approach, with obstetricians, midwives, nurses, and pediatricians central to adoption of the practice. Understanding the obstacles to implementation informs strategies to increase placental transfusion adoption of practice worldwide.

    Twin to twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a disease of the placenta (or afterbirth) that affects identical twin pregnancies. TTTS affects identical twins (or higher multiple gestations), who share a common monochorionic placenta. The shared placenta contains abnormal blood vessels, which connect the umbilical cords and circulations of the. Recently there have been a number of studies and presentations on the importance of providing a placental transfusion to the newborn. Early cord clamping is an avoidable, unphysiologic intervention that prevents the natural process of placental transfusion. However, placental transfusion, although simple in concept, is affected by multiple factors, is not always straightforward to implement.


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Placental transfusion by Alice C. Yao Download PDF EPUB FB2

Placental transfusion and perinatal complications are described, including cesarean birth, perinatal asphyxia, diabetes mellitus, and Rh hemolytic disease. The text concludes with physiologically based recommendations regarding the timing Placental transfusion book umbilical cord clamping at : Harold E.

Fox. ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Includes indexes. Description: xi, pages: illustrations ; 24 cm: Responsibility: by Alice C. Yao. Placental transfusion is the transfer of placental blood to the infant during the first few seconds after birth [14]. This procedure is associated with lower rates of mortality in preterm infants.

Placental transfusion: a review AC Katheria1, S Lakshminrusimha2, H Rabe3, R McAdams4 and JS Mercer5,6,7 Recently there have been a number of studies and presentations on the importance of providing a placental transfusion to the newborn.

Fetal growth discordance (FGD) and twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) are the most common problems. The MC twin placenta is usually a truly single, not fused, placenta that is produced by a single zygote and intended for the metabolic support of a singleton fetus.

There are three vascular consequences of the insertion of two or more Author: Caroline E. Fox, Enrico Lopriore, Mark D. Kilby. BACKGROUND: Risks and benefits of increasing placental transfusion in extremely preterm infants (extremely low birthweight [ELBW], g) are ill defined.

We performed a meta-analysis to compare long- and short-term outcomes of ELBW infants in trials of enhanced placental transfusion. Purpose. To determine if newborns who receive a full placental transfusion at birth differ in placental residual blood volume (PRBV) and 24 to 48‐hour hemoglobin (Hb) and total serum bilirubin (TSB) levels compared to newborns who receive no placental transfusion.

Time of cord clamping. Farrar et al. 6 estimated placental transfusion for both vaginal and cesarean births by measuring infant weight gain in the first 5 min after birth with their cords left.

IVON QC Placental Transfusion QI Project. Quality Improvement Metrics to be collected. Percent of infants without contraindications receiving placental transfusion. Percent of infants with contraindications who received placental transfusion. Infants. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS), also known as feto-fetal transfusion syndrome (FFTS), twin oligohydramnios-polyhydramnios sequence (TOPS) and stuck twin syndrome is a complication of disproportionate blood supply, resulting in high morbidity and mortality.

It can affect monochorionic multiples, that is, multiple pregnancies where two or more fetuses share a chorion and hence a single. Purchase Diagnostic Pathology: Placenta - 2nd Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN  Over the past decade, there have been several studies and reviews on the importance of providing a placental transfusion to the newborn.

Allowing a placental transfusion to occur by delaying the clamping of the umbilical cord is an extremely effective method of enhancing arterial oxygen content, increasing cardiac output, and improving oxygen delivery. Abstract. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of interventions promoting placental transfusion at delivery (delayed cord clamping or umbilical cord milking) compared with early cord clamping on outcomes among premature neonates of less than 32 weeks of gestation.

DATA SOURCES: A systematic search was conducted of PubMed, Embase, and databases (January. Placental findings in specific newborn/fetal or maternal conditions: twin transfusion twins umbilical vasculitis and funisitis uteroplacental insufficiency velamentous insertion villitis of unknown etiology yolk sac remnant Placenta books.

Crum: Heller: IARC: Kraus: Nucci: Placental Transfusion: Hemodynamic Effects. A number of studies highlight the potential cardiovascular benefits of placental transfusion in preterm infants. These include effects on mean BP, administration of volume and inotropes and other objective hemodynamic assessment methods [e.g., superior vena cava (SVC) blood flow, right ventricle output].

After death of donor twin, may get an acute reverse transfusion Case reports 22 year old pregnant woman with twins, one with oligohydramnios, one with polyhydramnios.

Fetomaternal transfusion can also result from invasive obstetrical procedures such as chorionic villus sampling, amniocentesis, funipuncture, therapeutic abortion, cesarean section, manual removal of the placenta, and from pathological conditions such as abdominal trauma, spontaneous abortion, or ectopic pregnancy (Sebring and Polesky ).

Denying any baby its full placental transfusion is a ghastly thing to do and these even more vulnerable babies require all the help they can get. Keeping them on their mother’s body will improve outcomes even more.

A lotus birth where the placenta is left to come away at the navel naturally will see a further improvement for these babies. Materials and methods.

Whether foetal haemoglobin-rich placental umbilical cord whole blood (which has the potential to carry more oxygen to the tissue Vol/Vol than adult blood, because of its foetal haemoglobin component) can be a safe substitute for adult blood, if collected aseptically after the birth of a healthy newborn at or near term, is the main scientific query behind the present study.

The effects of placental transfusion on respiratory mechanics of normal term newborn infants. Pediatrics ; – Scott, F, Evans, N. Distal gangrene in a polycythemic recipient fetus in twin–twin transfusion.

transfusion [trans-fu´zhun] the introduction of whole blood or blood components directly into the blood stream. Among the elements transfused are packed red blood cells, plasma, platelets, granulocytes, and cryoprecipitate, a plasma protein rich in antihemophilic factor VIII.

The current trend is to transfuse blood components rather than whole blood. But what I believe is important to note is that the expected weight gain after a unhampered placental transfusion should be about g ( g/kg), meaning that in this study, babies clamped after 2 minutes might only have obtained half of their possible weight gain.

Based on the B‐spline, placental transfusion contributed 32 ml (95% CI, 30–33 ml) per kilogram of birth weight to blood volume, but 24 ml (95% CI, 19–32 ml) based on inspection.

This equates to 40% (95% CI, 37–42%) and 30% (24–40%), respectively, of total potential blood volume.